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    NAB

    National Australia Bank (NAB) is a financial services organisation incorporated in Australia over 150 years ago. NAB has more than 43,000 people, operating over 1,800 stores and business banking centres, and is responsible to more than 480,000 shareholders.

    National Australia Bank (NAB) is a financial services organisation incorporated in Australia over 150 years ago. NAB has more than 43,000 people, operating over 1,800 stores and business banking centres, and is responsible to more than 480,000 shareholders. Our company is one of the five largest public corporations by market capitalisation in Australia.

    A key strategic priority for NAB is creating and maintaining a workforce that is reflective of the customers we serve and the communities we operate in, with a focus on gender, age and flexibility. We’re committed to creating and maintaining sustainable equity at all levels – from graduates to senior leaders and board members.

    Our Group Diversity & Inclusion Strategy focuses on three main strategic objectives:

    · Increased gender mix at senior levels of the organisation

    · Retention and engagement of mature age employees

    · Improving access for all people who have a disability

    Our flexibility agenda continues to evolve and supports the attraction and retention of employees.

    Video 1 image
    An interview with Christine Yates, Executive GM of NAB Private Wealth
    Video 2 image
    An interview with Angela Mentis, Group Executive Business Banking
    Video 3 image
    An interview with Cindy Batchelor, EGM NAB Business

    Life at NAB

    Partner Content

    Step up and be counted in the workplace

    June 29, 2015

    Confidence is one thing, but having a strategy, seeking the right advice and even getting more education can help you secure the career you want.

    Knowing one’s worth can be an underlying struggle in any professional’s career. In particular, women can feel they lack the seniority, expertise or contacts to apply for a promotion or pay rise. Others might feel qualified for a new role, but seem to be consistently overlooked by management.

    According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, the national gender pay gap is currently at 18.8% with men coming out on top. The source of the discrepancy is complex, but gaining confidence and recognition in the workplace can be an important step for women hoping to maximise their pay potential.

    Louise Harvey-Wills, Executive General Manager, People at NAB, says even in egalitarian workplaces women can do more to leverage their skills.

    “You can be working somewhere with the best policies, programs and practices that give both men and women the same career opportunities, but if you don’t believe in yourself and take advantage of the career opportunities then you may be compromising your personal value.”

    Those career opportunities might not be immediately obvious. With women often feeling as though they need to be overqualified for a position, Harvey-Wills says they should be proactive and try to push their own boundaries.

    “To get noticed we should all take chances and step out of our comfort zones to make this happen. Don’t wait for opportunities to come to you.”

    That same proactive solution can apply to women who feel undervalued in the workplace. Harvey-Wills advises women to communicate directly with their senior managers, raising constructive solutions, not just complaints.

    Don’t just wing it

    Taking control over one’s career requires not just confidence, but also time and research.

    “One tip I have for women to improve and gain more confidence around financial matters and their careers is to ensure they invest the adequate time in themselves,” says Harvey-Wills. “Talk to people who have the knowledge and skills that you’re after.”

    She also recommends women thoroughly research both global and local trends in their industries and other markets.

    “And leverage your networks to test your thinking and your reasoning to give you the confidence you need.”

    The importance of role models, sponsors and mentors – one’s personal board of directors – should not be underestimated, notes Harvey-Wills.

    “Your sponsors are integral in your career progression and development, so use them.”

    The professional networks gained in the course of a woman’s career can help expand her skills and consolidate her expertise.

    For those looking to gain new skills or change the direction of their career, education can also be a valuable source of confidence. Study, says Harvey-Wills, can give professionals new ways of utilising their existing skills, and challenge their thinking.

    However, she advises women think carefully about what they hope to gain from study before embarking on a new course.

    “When determining if study is right for you, be clear on what you want to achieve from it and how it relates to your career aspirations,” she says.

    “Technical skills and experience are important and can often be achieved learning on the job or from a secondment opportunity.”

    Success lies in your attitude

    Ultimately, Harvey-Wills says, having the right attitude can be one of the biggest assets in a woman’s career.

    “You need to have the confidence and self-belief to back yourself, whatever your age or experience. If you believe you can do something and present it confidently, then you minimise the chance of underselling your true skills and the value you can bring,” she explains.

    “Be authentic to your values. If you are true to yourself, your ambitions and your priorities, it can only strengthen your earning potential.”

    For more information on NAB’s Start Counting program visit: www.startcounting.com.au.

    Written by: Jessie Richardson

    What's on offer at NAB

    Partner Content

    In order to qualify as a Select Employer, we ask employers to address at least 60% of the ten items on the Select Employer criteria list including:

    Senior leadership

    The employer has a rising number of women in senior positions and a pipeline of female talent.

    The employer has a rising number of women in senior positions and a pipeline of female talent.

    • NAB’s public gender targets includes increasing the number of women in executive management (the top three layers of the organisationi), from 23% to 33% by 2015.
    • Gender equality means having the right people in the right role at the right time. NAB is strengthening the talent pipeline by targeting an even representation of women and men on NAB’s core Australian talent development programs.
    • Targeting ‘hot-spots’ – such as parental leave return to work and retention rates will support the transition of women to senior management.

    Flexible careers

    The employer can demonstrate where flexible working arrangements have led to promotions.

    The employer can demonstrate where flexible working arrangements have led to promotions.

    • NAB is committed to creating and maintaining a workforce which is representative of our customers and communities and in which individual differences are valued and respected– it’s good for our employees and good for the business.
    • A key part of this is creating a workplace where women and men are able to grow their careers and that also supports their personal and family life.
    • NAB offers a wide range of flexible working options available to all employees, regardless of seniority – from job sharing to working from home and extending leave. The right option depends on a balance between the needs of the individual, the role, the team, customers and the business.

    International travel

    The employer offers opportunities for employees to gain experience in international markets.

    The employer offers opportunities for employees to gain experience in international markets.

      Whilst our core franchise is Australian-based, we also have interests in New Zealand, Asia, the United Kingdom and the United States. NAB encourages women and men to take advantage of opportunities across all NAB Group businesses by having one central job centre site available to all NAB employees. NAB also has international relocation policies in place for employees, where appropriate.

    Parental Leave

    The employer offers paid parental leave.

    The employer offers paid parental leave.

    • 12 weeks paid parental leave for primary carers and two weeks for secondary carers.
    • Up to 40 weeks of superannuation at 10% during unpaid parental leave, in addition to the 12 weeks of paid leave and superannuation.
    • Service recognition - In 2013, the Group changed the way service is calculated for the purpose of recognising career milestones. Any extended leave that employees take (or have taken in the past) is now included in the calculation of their years of tenure for service recognition. Many women take extended breaks from the workplace while on parental leave - this change recognises women’s ongoing service to the Group and demonstrates our commitment to equality in the workplace.
    • Domestic Violence Support Policy - Domestic violence affects an employee’s attendance at work, performance and safety. It also costs Australian workplaces and businesses in loss of productivity, attendance and turn over. To address this, the Group launched its first Domestic Violence Support Policy, the first of its kind for a major Australian bank, which supports our employees who experience domestic violence in dealing with the impacts of this issue.

      Leadership Training

      The employer offers leadership training programs to staff, either internally or externally.

      The employer offers leadership training programs to staff, either internally or externally.

        Building people leader capability across NAB. NAB offers core talent development programs and publicly measures proportion of women on these programs.

      Women on the board

      At least 20% of the employer’s board positions are occupied by women.

      At least 20% of the employer’s board positions are occupied by women.
      • NAB has actively encouraged women to join NAB Group subsidiary boards through NAB Board Ready.
      • NAB Board Ready Program is an internally designed and managed program, created to assist NAB's female population in gaining an understanding of boards and being a director, whether on a NAB subsidiary board, or on an external company. It provides participants with access to key educational and networking opportunities to enable them to build the skills and confidence to participate in the boardroom.

        Women on shortlists

        The employer has a demonstrated policy of ensuring women are always shortlisted for positions.

        The employer has a demonstrated policy of ensuring women are always shortlisted for positions.
        • Diversity clause in our Preferred Supplier Service Agreement for external recruitment agencies: From January 2012 all NAB’s preferred external recruitment suppliers need to demonstrate that they comply with NAB’s Diversity and Inclusion Policy, have a written diversity policy/framework for their business, and undertake appropriate diversity training for their people.
        • NAB mandates female participation in job candidate pools and gender diverse interview panels, as well as ensuring all recruitment into senior management has a strong gender balance (including NAB’s external recruitment suppliers). This extends to NAB’s Graduate Program where we aim to have 50/50 gender balance.

        Mentoring and sponsoring

        The employer offers mentoring and/or sponsorship programs to women.

        The employer offers mentoring and/or sponsorship programs to women.
        • The business case for increasing female representation in leadership positions is well recognised at Board and Executive level at NAB. The Realise Program is tailored to small groups of individuals from across the organisation and is targeted towards women who will transition into such roles. The program has been designed to target this audience for succession and talent pipeline progression. This inspiring group mentoring program helps participants develop themselves and their career resiliency skills. Participants are supported in engaging a senior mentor as part of the program.

        Diversity Program

        The employer boasts a wide-ranging diversity program that has the buy-in of key senior leaders.

        The employer boasts a wide-ranging diversity program that has the buy-in of key senior leaders.
        • NAB Board Ready is NAB’s own program to educate senior women about NAB subsidiary board operations.
        • Realise - empowering women in their career to prepare for the transition into senior management roles
        • MyFuture is NAB’s approach to supporting mature age employees, a program which helps these employees and their people leaders make informed decisions about their future, whether this be redirection, a change of pace, or retirement.
        • reConnect newsletter keeps employees on extended leave, such as parental leave, connected to the organisation and helps them successfully return to work.
        • Employee Network Groups Connecting Women, Pride@NAB, NABility

        Gender Targets

        The employer publicises and actively works to achieve gender targets across different levels.

        The employer publicises and actively works to achieve gender targets across different levels.

        Measurable objectives and progress

        The measurable objectives for achieving gender diversity which have been set by the Board in accordance with the Group Diversity & Inclusion Policy, and our progress towards achieving them, are set out in the table below. Measurable objectives

        • Increase the number of women in executive management (the top three layers of the organisation1), from 23% to 33% by 2015.

        • Increase the proportion of women on Group subsidiary boards from 14% to 30% by 2015.

        • Increase the number of female non-executive directors on the Board of directors of the Company, as vacancies and circumstances allow, with the aim of achieving a representation of at least 30%.

        Strengthen the talent pipeline by targeting a 50/50 gender balance in the Australian graduate program intake and an even representation of women and men on NAB's core Australian talent development programs from 2011 onwards.

        For measurable progress on targets please visit www.nab.com.au

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