Deputy police chief quits after backlash from controversial comments

‘Too many women’: Deputy police chief quits after backlash from controversial comments

The deputy police and crime commissioner for Hampshire in England, Luke Stubbs, has resigned from his position after facing backlash for his controversial comments about quotas and equality goals. 

Stubbs, who attended a fire service meeting last year in December, claimed that white men were not being given equal opportunities and insisted that the number of women in the fire service should be reduced. 

“The government – and I think this is wrong – is bringing in quota programmes across the public sector, but only where it benefits women and minorities,” said Stubbs. 

“In areas where it’s mostly men it has to be 50/50, but in areas where it’s mostly women there’s no change.”

“Things like the control room have 84 per cent women and I would like assurance that steps are being taken to reduce that.”

The comments were met with public outcry, and Stubbs has subsequently apologised after facing a wave of backlash.

“I have reflected on the comments I made at the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Fire and Rescue Authority meeting. I sincerely wish to apologise for any harm or offence caused by the comments I made,” Stubbs said in a statement. 

In response to the situation, police and crime commissioner, Donna Jones, whom Stubbs had served under, said she supported the equality work of the fire service. 

“As the first woman to be elected as police and crime commissioner for Hampshire and Isle of Wight and also the first woman to be the executive leader of a city unitary council in Hampshire, I am committed to inspiring women and girls across all of our communities.”

Hampshire and Isle of Wight Fire and Rescue Service has claimed that equality quotas in the service do not exist. Despite this, Jones has encouraged more commitment to ensure there is diversity and inclusion in the workplace. 

“Equality for everyone is something that is within our reach. I support equality and diversity work being undertaken by Hampshire and Isle of Wight Fire and Rescue Service.”

The county’s police and crime panel’s sub-committee had met to discuss the complaints against Stubbs, and the Local Democracy Reporting Service has learned that he has since stepped down from his role. 

“Following the comments made at the Hampshire Fire and Rescue authority meeting in December, Luke Stubbs offered his resignation from the role of deputy police and crime commissioner and I have accepted it,” said Jones.

“I wish Luke well for the future.”

Stay Smart! Get Savvy!

Get Women's Agenda in your inbox