Most Australian women are dissatisfied with the Morrison government

Only 17 per cent of working Australian women are satisfied with the Morrison government

Fifty-one per cent of working women in Australia are dissatisfied with the Morrison government, according to Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU) poll of more than 1000 people conducted last month.

The poll found women were more likely than men to consider the cost of living, increasing wages and housing affordability as key election issues.

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australian women earn on average $255.30 or 13.8 per cent less each week than men. 

ACTU president Michele O’Neil insists the survey shows women “don’t trust Scott Morrison” or “believe” he cares about the issues that concern them, adding that even women who are disinterested in politics are becoming increasingly concerned about the state of inflation, wages and housing prices.

“These are critical issues and the government ignores them to their own peril,” O’Neil told NCA NewsWire.

“Every party and every politician needs to understand that you can’t just pay lip service to what matters to women. Women need to have policies and plans that will deliver real change.”

Earlier this month, O’Neil publicly backed the Albanese Labor Government, when it announced action would be taken to address the failure of the industrial relations system to secure pay equity for women and that it would end the systemic underpayment of workers in women-dominated industries.

“Australian working women are fighting for pay equity against a broken system in desperate need of reform,” O’Neil said in a statement welcoming the announcement.

“The failure of the Morrison Government on closing the gender pay gap means that women are bearing the brunt of the cost of living crisis.”

“The changes announced today will create a system which seeks to fix the problem, rather than preserve the status quo. We cannot afford to lose another three years to a Morrison Government which fails women on every issue. We need a Government which will do the work to close the gender pay gap.”

Last Sunday, Labour leader Albanese and Prime Minister Morrison used their first live leaders’ debate to announce women-centric policies —  Albanese pledged funding for playgroups, while Morrison said he would put into place a $53m reproductive healthcare package.

Albanese conceded that while he may not be able to guarantee wages rises exceeding that of inflation under a Labor government, he would ensure gender pay equity becomes an objective of the Fair Work Act

In the past fortnight, Labor has directed its female vote by promising new economic measures to help close the wage gap and assist working mothers and women.

The Australian Council of Trade Unions will use the results of its latest poll to boost its position as it demands a minimum-wage increase of 5.5 per cent.

Stay Smart! Get Savvy!

Get Women's Agenda in your inbox